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Physicists Discover A Second Layer Of Information Hidden In Our DNA

DNA is fascinating, and we stand to learn so much about who we are, where we came from, and what we are capable of (biologically speaking) f...

DNA is fascinating, and we stand to learn so much about who we are, where we came from, and what we are capable of (biologically speaking) from its study. 

by Arjun Walia

Our capabilities in particular have yet to be studied in-depth by the mainstream scientific community.

Yet the study of phenomena like the placebo effect, distant healing, telepathy, and the physical impacts of human intention, not to mention the Mind-Body connection, has yielded statistically significant results which have been available in ‘reputable peer reviewed journals’ for decades.


How does this relate to DNA? Well, there are many codes in our DNA that scientists have yet to crack. Parts of our DNA, for example have no known biological function, or at least we have yet to discover them.

Maybe they have spiritual applications, or are connected to the non-physical realm in some way. These seemingly useless DNA are referred to as ‘Junk DNA,’ or ‘non-coding DNA.’ But we are learning more about them each day, as Scientific American reports, so the label isn’t entirely accurate.

We may think we know a lot, but the things we think we know and hold to be true are always changing. Science was no less valid to us 50 years ago than it is today, but theories have changed because we have learned more. And our knowledge of DNA has just changed again, as physicists have confirmed that there is a second layer of information hidden in our DNA, meaning that there is more than one way that DNA mutations can affect us.

The way DNA folds plays a role in controlling which genes are expressed inside of our bodies. When it comes to biology, we’re taught that DNA ‘makes us who we are’ through a sequence of letters.

These codes would then determine which proteins to make in order to produce the necessary result. For example, there is a code for a protein that will make your skin brown, or your eyes dark, etc.

All of this is determined by the way DNA is folded. Since the DNA in our body is extremely long, spanning a length of up to two metres, it has to be wrapped and folded in a ce